Tag Archive | "RPGEH"

DNA of 100,000 Kaiser Permanente members genotyped in 15 months, creating novel resource for research

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

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Resulting Data Will Provide Novel Resource for Accelerating Research One of the nation’s largest and most diverse genomics projects reached its first major milestone in just 15 months. Scientists have genotyped the DNA and analyzed the telomere lengths in more than 100,000 Kaiser Permanente Northern California members who agreed to be part of the research. […]

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RPGEH: A world-class genomics project studying disease causes and healthy aging

Wednesday, February 2, 2011

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RPGEH: A world-class genomics project studying disease causes and healthy aging

It’s not every day Division of Research staff members are briefed by a Nobel Prize winner. Recently, 100 employees of the Division and its Research Program on Genes, Environment, and Health (RPGEH) hosted Elizabeth Blackburn, PhD, one of three scientists awarded the 2009 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine. Her visit was no coincidence. Thanks […]

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Voice of the RPGEH: Marcia Ewing and the phone/survey team

Sunday, January 30, 2011

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It’s simply a case of cause and effect. To recruit 500,000 Northern California Kaiser Permanente members for a research project, the Research Program for Genes, Environment and Health (RPGEH) had to gracefully and efficiently handle the masses of mail and flocks of phone calls that would be headed its way. For more about the Research […]

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RPGEH: Fast facts

Saturday, January 29, 2011

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A bullet-point list of basic facts about the Research Program on Genes, Environment, and Health. The goal is a database with 500,000 participants. -- 430,000 have completed a health survey -- 170,000 gave saliva samples Future participants will be asked for blood samples, rather than saliva, so researchers may also collect data found in blood -- not saliva -- about biomarkers and environmental exposures

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